THE FERRYMAN'S SEAT, SOUTHWARK, LONDON

This unobtrusive relic of medieval London, hidden away in a side wall of a Greek Restaurant, is the only remaining evidence of the less than salubrious life on the River Thames before all of the bridges were built, before the city was cleaned up and turned into the shiny, chrome metropolis it now is.

A boat sailing down the Thames
The Thames at Southwark

On the Thames near Shakespeare's Globe, the Bankside Pier and Southwark Bridge, is a small alleyway called Bear Gardens. It can be hard to find, it is simply a nondescript, narrow gap between two tall modern buildings with chain restaurants on the ground floors, which are plastered in their logos, menus and other marketing paraphernalia.


Just inside the alleyway, built into the wall of the Real Greek restaurant, is the ferryman's seat, a tiny and well worn stone ledge, with a small silver plaque above it.

The Ferrymans Seat

This simple little ledge is all that remains of the ferr